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What is ovarian cancer? It’s a cancer that begins in the female organs called the ovaries. And it’s a cancer that often goes undetected in the early stages when it’s most treatable. Which is why you need to know the facts about ovarian cancer now, before it’s too late.

Why You Need To Know The Facts About Ovarian Cancer Now

I’m one of the lucky ones in that I don’t have a personal story to share about ovarian cancer. But unfortunately many others aren’t so lucky. And while ovarian cancer doesn’t get as much press as breast cancer, it’s not any less of a serious disease. So let’s change that. Let’s raise awareness of this lesser known form of cancer.

Did you know?

  1. Ovarian cancer ranks 5th in cancer deaths amongst women.
  2. 14,000 women die each year from ovarian cancer.
  3. Only 15% of ovarian cancers are diagnosed at stage 1.
  4. A Pap test doesn’t detect ovarian cancer.

Why You Need To Know The Facts About Ovarian Cancer Now

These are pretty scary statistics. I just recently learned about them myself and I’m kicking myself for not sharing it last month during Ovarian Cancer Awareness month.

But as Kayla Mackie at ConsumerSafety.org told me, even though ovarian cancer month is September, it’s still important to know the life-saving information every day of the year. And dear readers, you need to know the facts about ovarian cancer now.

Which is why I’m sharing this information, in hopes of spreading awareness about ovarian cancer. As Kayla said, “I truly believe we can help save lives by better informing friends, family, and women everywhere about the symptoms and risk factors of ovarian cancer.”

Don’t forget to pin this article “Ovarian Cancer – Why You Need To Know The Facts Now” to your favorite Pinterest board for later.

Ovarian Cancer - Why You Need To Know The Facts Now

 

Key Statistics About Ovarian Cancer

⇒ Ovarian cancer ranks 5th in cancer deaths amongst women.

⇒ Ovarian cancer is the #1 cause of gynecologic cancer deaths.

⇒ Every 23 minutes, a woman is diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the United States.

Every 23 minutes, a woman is diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the United States. Click To Tweet

⇒ Women have a 1 in 75 chance of developing ovarian cancer in their lifetime. This means that for every 75 women in the U.S., 1 will get a diagnosis of ovarian cancer during her lifetime.

⇒ Half the women who develop ovarian cancer are over the age of 60.

⇒ Around 22,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer every year.

⇒ 14,000 women die each year from ovarian cancer. That’s more than half the number of women diagnosed.

⇒ Only 15% of ovarian cancers are diagnosed at stage 1. In fact, it often goes undetected until it has spread within the pelvis. By that point it becomes more difficult to treat and can even be fatal.

With around 22,440 new cases of ovarian cancer predicted for 2017, it’s possible that a woman you know may receive a diagnosis. – Fox News

Symptoms

There may be no or only vague symptoms in the early stages of ovarian cancer. Which is another reason why this form of cancer is not always caught early enough.

If you have any questions, contact your health care professional. Here are common symptoms of ovarian cancer. But it’s important to note they may not present until later stages, so awareness and prevention are essential.

And yes, they are typical symptoms of many other ailments, but if in doubt, don’t hesitate to seek a professional opinion.

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⇒ Bloating

⇒ Pelvic or abdominal pain

⇒ Abdominal swelling

⇒ Trouble eating or feeling full quickly

⇒ Weight loss or loss of appetite

⇒ Feeling the need to urinate urgently or often

⇒ Fatigue

⇒ Upset stomach

⇒ Back pain

⇒ Pain during sex

⇒ Constipation or menstrual changes

 

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Know What Increases Your Risk

Certain factors may increase your risk of ovarian cancer.

⇒ A family history of breast or ovarian cancer. It’s important to know what health issues run in your family, whether it’s cancer, heart disease, diabetes, etc. so talk to your family members. This is info you want to be able to pass onto your kids as well.

⇒ Genetic mutations such as BRCA1 and BRCA2

⇒ Post-menopausal

⇒ Increasing in age over 40

⇒ Obesity, or a BMI of at least 30

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How To Reduce Your Risk

So now you know some of the statistics. Let’s go over ways you can reduce your risk of developing ovarian cancer.

⇒ Birth Control: If you take birth control pills consistently for 5+ years, your risk of developing ovarian cancer can be reduced by 50% .

⇒ Get Screened: Get screened for genetic factors including BRCA1 and BRCA1.

⇒ Your Diet: Eat cancer fighting foods rich in vitamin A, D & E such as leafy greens, nuts, beans, eggs, sweet potatoes, carrots, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Why You Need To Know The Facts About Ovarian Cancer Now

Related Article: Top Ten Power Packed Foods

Spread The Word

If caught and treated in an early stage, ovarian cancer is often curable. So I encourage you to share this article with a friend to help raise awareness. Now go out there and tell others why you need to know the facts about ovarian cancer now.

I want to thank ConsumerSafety.org for providing the graphics and a portion of the facts and statistics in this article. To learn more, visit their website: ConsumerSafety.org

ConsumerSafety.org is teaming up with a non-profit in Syracuse, NY, Hope for Heather, whose proceeds go to national ovarian cancer research foundations. So if you’re looking to make a difference, you can make a donation Hope for Heather. Donations go towards national research efforts. Feel free to visit their donation page here.


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4 comments on “Why You Need To Know The Facts About Ovarian Cancer Now”

  1. I know someone who had breast cancer but I’m sure anyone with ovarian cancer would suffer similarly. I’ll pass this along to friends.

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